Israeli Municipality Reveals New Plan to Reclaim Dead Dump

The dike of what was once rural waste in southern Israel may be finally starting to fill in. Over the years, Israel’s principal dump has been the southern coastal community of Ashkelon. The rubbish…

Israeli Municipality Reveals New Plan to Reclaim Dead Dump

The dike of what was once rural waste in southern Israel may be finally starting to fill in.

Over the years, Israel’s principal dump has been the southern coastal community of Ashkelon. The rubbish mountain there has been growing at an alarming rate. The workers are now trying to kickstart the slow process of reclaiming land around the dump.

The pile is standing at the mouth of the Jordan River, and reaches upwards over 100 meters (328 feet). There is simply so much waste in the area that it would be impossible to remove it by digging tunnels under the surface.

No other country on Earth is dumping so much raw material in such a short space of time, says Green Party activist Israel Katz.

Popularly known as the “Scalpel Dump,” Ashkelon’s trash stack was expanded recently as part of a government settlement deal with terrorists. In return for handing over the confiscated houses and farmland of the town’s Palestinian Bedouin minority, the government has been promising them a site for a new dump.

“What we don’t see in Ashkelon is going to be dumped as garbage, it’s going to be taken by human trucks,” Israel Katz told Fox News. “All the trash is going to be moved elsewhere because otherwise, I think, the Ashkelon region would become very dangerous,” he added.

A government website states: “The Golan-Rieh area landfill project will significantly reduce toxic waste on the periphery and prevent coastal erosion, diminishing the hazard from toxic waste.”

Excavation work on the heap began in August 2016, but it hasn’t quite reached its hoped-for number of 100,000 cubic meters (4.5 million cubic feet). The dump will be connected by tunnels and 20 percent of the waste will be recycled.

Israel Katz believes the process could take several years to complete and even then the landfill might not fill all of Ashkelon’s waste.

The garbage will eventually be returned to the sea, he says.

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