A conversation with Saldana’s family about making her books accessible to a new generation

In The Conversation with Sara Rosenfeld, Laurie Saldana, a modernist artist who died in 2017, is profiled by her three children, and the new books she both published (with the foreword by Emily Listopadoff)…

A conversation with Saldana’s family about making her books accessible to a new generation

In The Conversation with Sara Rosenfeld, Laurie Saldana, a modernist artist who died in 2017, is profiled by her three children, and the new books she both published (with the foreword by Emily Listopadoff) and influenced (with an introduction by David Zwirner) have a lot to say about the fact that her work did not travel across the centuries. Read our interview with Mr. Saldana here.

Read Mr. Listopadoff’s interview with Saldana here and Ms. Listopadoff’s interview with Ms. Molyneux here.

These are the stories. Many of these stories are inspired by Mollie’s, which was released in paperback in January by Fine Line Books.

Laurie Saldana was born June 25, 1927. Her art drew from the Bauhaus movement, taking the dominant principles of modernism and butting them against influences as diverse as the US Civil War and San Francisco’s earthquake of 1906. In 1951, she was a Bauhaus student in Bremen, Germany.

After World War II, she studied in New York, and in 1955 completed her thesis, “One Square After Another,” which was later published as “In the Shadow of the Tall Castle,” and used an aerial view of her home district in Brooklyn to tell the story of a housing project. She was featured in the National Arts Club’s “Women’s Wing of the Round Table” in 1957.

Laurie Saldana was married to Alice Boscio, whom she met when she went to get her breasts checked by the doctor. After the war, she spent some time living in Berlin.

Alice Boscio was born June 16, 1917, and grew up in Greece before emigrating to New York in 1929. Laurie Saldana and Alice Boscio remarried in 1951. They had three children: Joseph, Abigail, and Robert.

Alice Boscio died May 31, 2013. Laurie Saldana died June 11, 2017.

In 2009, Robert Saldana published “True Mommies: 100 Young Mothers with a Downside.”

Laurie Saldana and her friend Mary Selby looked closely at their parents’ way of raising their children, both male and female, during the same time period.

While Laurie Saldana’s most significant book was her first, “Even Though I Am Young,” written with Stella Selby in 1993, it was released to acclaim and made her a star in Europe.

It’s considered the only major historical account of American women’s lives in the first decades of the 20th century. Read our profile of Saldana here.

At the end of 1969, John Saldana, Laurie’s son, published “The Four Mommies: New and New Age.” His work had a lasting influence, and “Mommies” continues to be copied and made into carousel rides.

In 2003, David Zwirner published “How the Magnetic Child Mirrors the Future.”

The illustrator Gabriele Bonzani and her husband, Pietro Bonzani, created thousands of words in the work of Ms. Molyneux. The new and updated editions will include multiple volumes, each tracing the different phases of her career.

The anthology will be published in April and is also part of a traveling show, which will make stops in five cities, including New York, in February.

Looking Back at Boundaries, a site that chronicled Nora Ephron’s writing, and collected and organized many of her columns, will be available March 11.

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