U.S. allies are lobbying American travelers to visit places like Germany and Italy

In a bid to cut down on a growing trade deficit with the United States, many of its allies are trying to lure back tourists. In recent months, many of the U.S.’s longstanding trading…

U.S. allies are lobbying American travelers to visit places like Germany and Italy

In a bid to cut down on a growing trade deficit with the United States, many of its allies are trying to lure back tourists. In recent months, many of the U.S.’s longstanding trading partners have been turning to the visa waiver program for a foreign worker, which eliminates the usual hoops that U.S. visitors must jump through to visit a number of countries.

The U.S. is restricting the length of stays and the number of visitors who can visit the U.S. for shorter periods of time and has implemented a total ban on new applications. Many of these countries were hoping to receive a surge of visitors with a shorter period of stays and to counter the impact on their economies by having fewer citizens traveling to the U.S. With the boom coming to a screeching halt, these countries are rushing to get their hands on U.S. travelers.

To help make the point, the United Nations World Tourism Organization released a statement this week promising “the return of the American visitor,” saying that according to United Nations figures, the United States is the most visited country in the world, with 220 million tourists in 2017.

“People spend money while they are in tourism locations,” the tourism office of Jordan told CBS News. “When people leave a country, if they are poorer, they will leave because they are struggling with debts. When tourism returns to this country, there will be a huge [spending] increase.”

Kabul Tourism Promotion Bureau said that it will be working “tirelessly to convince American tourists to make Afghanistan their next destination,” and it was among the first to create a “SMO-d Tourist Website and Viral Campaign” with the hashtag #traveltoazad2019.

In addition to encouraging travelers to the U.S., many of the nations taking advantage of the program have rolled out special promotions that cost just a fraction of the cost. Consider:

Germany: A five-night vacation in Munich costs $93.

France: A two-night getaway in Paris costs about $69.

Italy: The same trip costs $68.

The European countries, which have been hesitant in the past to invite U.S. travelers to their shores following the Trump administration’s hostility toward their trade relationship, are now looking to lure U.S. visitors to rival countries that they argue are not as welcoming to foreigners. “We want [American tourists] to feel that they are arriving into a friendlier or safer climate,” says Oleg Gherman, a Russian diplomat who is head of the tourism bureau of Germany’s metropole, Berlin, which lost 11,000 holiday hotel rooms in the last year after German travelers responded to reports about the extent of German police brutality against migrants by reporting that they would not visit.

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