Should the mayor of New York City actually enforce a law against vaccination?

In a careful message to the media, one has to give Mike Adams (e-shoe maker) credit for being a historian. Here is a quote from last week’s newsletter: “To truly ensure the safety of…

Should the mayor of New York City actually enforce a law against vaccination?

In a careful message to the media, one has to give Mike Adams (e-shoe maker) credit for being a historian.

Here is a quote from last week’s newsletter:

“To truly ensure the safety of our children, it’s not enough to simply reinforce America’s federal vaccine mandates,” Mr. Adams said in a statement. “We must also give parents the freedom to listen to their own doctors and make their own decisions.”

And then:

In my view, the best course of action is to overturn New York’s compulsory vaccination law, which is part of a state law that led to the Rockland and Long Island area to become one of the biggest centers of anti-vaccination activity in the country. It needs to be eliminated. And once it is, we can look to adopt other vaccine-critical laws like the Guillain-Barre law passed earlier this year.

Adams went on to repeatedly note that it was some “libertarian nut” in NY City who, in 2006, passed a law requiring public schools to require vaccination for all children. And here is Adams’ take on the meaning of the word “trespass”:

As I am doing now, I will “nondent” the vaccine legislation in a free people’s court. The courts will interpret the law to trump legislation and order clear grounds that the mandatory vaccinations are not just bad public policy, but discriminatory, possibly unconstitutional, and unethical. Because no one seems to notice and our politicians and the media refuse to report it, this is happening all across the country and it will not be stopped until we pressure public agencies into treating it as a civil rights violation.

Despite Adams’ assurances, the fact remains that the mayor-elect, Bill de Blasio, is not going to enforce the law.

So, at least among the pool of potential mayors, N.Y.C.’s transportation head, Betsy Gotbaum, is the first candidate to announce she won’t enforce the law.

Adams, therefore, went for a bit of the moral high ground:

The people of Rockland County in Westchester County and the Rockland County Executive have resigned themselves to the damage being done by irresponsible parents whose children show up at public schools unexcused with vaccinations they can’t possibly receive in their right minds. Unfortunately, most of our politicians are standing with them. But not Betsy Gotbaum. When the law was passed, she did not believe that public health mandates or education mandates or anything mandating against public morals should trump individual rights.

He is correct about the fact that Gotbaum, running for reelection in Rockland County, clearly disagrees with his views. But: according to one reputable New York based writer, there are no enforced enrollment policies in Rockland County schools.

So I wonder, in the spirit of Adams’ rhetoric about “free people’s courts,” whether we should give Gotbaum a great big salute for not enforcing a law that she has no intention of enforcing.

Adams says he won’t go down that route because the judge has ruled the law to be unconstitutional.

You don’t disagree with the constitution? That goes against your beliefs! That is not right! That can’t happen!

On the other hand, Adams says the court’s ruling would allow “parents to listen to their own doctors and make their own decisions.” So one must really start to ask Adams: is it too much to ask that if a doctor says your child shouldn’t have a vaccine, you can listen to your own doctors?

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