Nine days before the first presidential debate, CNN announces 2019 ‘Heroes of the Year’ honorees

Nine days before the first presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, CNN announced its 2019 “Heroes of the Year” honorees, a list that will once again highlight Americans who defy threats to…

Nine days before the first presidential debate, CNN announces 2019 ‘Heroes of the Year’ honorees

Nine days before the first presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, CNN announced its 2019 “Heroes of the Year” honorees, a list that will once again highlight Americans who defy threats to their lives in service to others, the network said. The network will honor 10 men and women, including Americans who’ve saved the lives of others.

The Heroes of the Year list will be determined by the thoughts and actions of CNN’s dedicated citizen journalism team. CNN will announce those honorees Friday, April 27, at 10 a.m. Eastern. The network’s veterans and military coverage leads CNN Newsroom with Don Lemon, and a special edition of Anderson Cooper 360° — “National Heroes: A Nation Salutes” — will air Thursday, May 3, at 10 p.m. Eastern.

Here’s a list of the 10 honorees:

Alexander Balták, California

Balták was working security at San Diego International Airport when he found a bullet hole in his truck. Several days later, the airport announced it was hiring a new security director.

Tyler Bryant, Georgia

Bryant, an off-duty Atlanta police officer, fatally shot a 26-year-old friend on an Atlanta street during a drunken brawl and then charged into another man and stabbed him.

Peter Bonilla, South Carolina

When a single-engine plane crashed into a soybean field in downtown Charleston, Bonilla and two others pulled survivors to safety and faced down violent mob threats.

Matthew Bossert, Iowa

Bossert, the acting chief of the Iowa Department of Transportation, was on his way to work when a freight train derailed and crashed into his vehicle, killing his two daughters.

Claudia Culver, Iowa

Culver, chief of police in a small eastern Iowa town, created a Facebook page to advertise a job opening at the local police department. She got more than 1,600 applicants, and after a three-month recruiting process, the Des Moines Police Department hired her.

Cathleen Dobbs, Washington

Dobbs was working in a building when an explosion occurred that shook the entire upper floor. The building’s owner responded, delivering a burning bottle of alcohol to his coworkers that quickly stopped the blaze.

Sela Dew, Los Angeles

Dew, a local chef, prepared food for an HIV/AIDS organization in 2013. When an ambulance responded to an emergency call that involved a patient with a code seizure, Dew charged onto the lawn to calm the patient until help arrived.

Steve Karras, Michigan

Karras, a former Marine, beat a man to death during a robbery of his home.

Lisa Miller, Michigan

Miller, an artist, became sick and disoriented after a truck ran over her at a roadside stand. She refused to let the car leave, yelling “it was my bike, it wasn’t my bike” to police. The man behind the wheel was charged with assault after officials said he refused to give his identity.

Armand Norwood, California

Norwood, an emergency room doctor, saved the life of a 3-year-old boy who became paralyzed when he was shaken by a sibling.

Keith Ramsey, Louisiana

Ramsey, founder of an empowerment center in Little Rock, Ark., found himself hiding from a line of shotgun-wielding men, many who accused him of being black separatist. He feared he might be shot if he reported the threats to the police.

Wendy Rhodes, South Carolina

Rhodes, a teacher’s aide, found that an 11-year-old boy came to her office drunk and was causing trouble. After a worker told her what he’d been drinking, she refused to send him home and took the child outside to calm him down.

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